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Foreign Affairs

While much of the power to conduct foreign affairs is granted to the president by the U.S. Constitution, Congress can and should still shape foreign policy and play a vital role in ensuring the world remains a safe place and that our citizens are protected from harm.

For example, Congress maintains control over the “purse strings” and funds our national defense and foreign assistance. As a member of the House Appropriations Committee, I have had the opportunity to see firsthand how foreign assistance is used to support American values all over the world. On average, about one percent of foreign aid is provided as direct budget support (cash) to foreign governments. The remainder of aid is given in the form of expert technical advice, training, equipment, vaccines, food, educational exchanges and applied research. Much of the work done by America and its citizens internationally is crucial to lifting developing countries out of poverty and promoting long-term development.

Additionally, through the appropriations process, Congress can help ensure that funding goes to countries to build stability and counter international threats. Approximately 1.3 percent of the total federal budget is designated for foreign assistance from all federal sources. Aid that promotes global prosperity, democracy and rule of law, economic growth and humanitarian interests reflects American values and global leadership.

More on Foreign Affairs

January 30, 2020 Press Release
Washington, D.C. – Congressman Tom Cole (OK-04) released the following statement after the U.S. House of Representatives voted on two resolutions related to war powers.
January 13, 2020 Weekly Columns
Earlier this month, the Pentagon announced that the U.S. military and intelligence communities were successful in taking out terrorist leader General Qasem Soleimani during an airstrike in Baghdad, Iraq. Soleimani was more than a bad actor. He was a designated terrorist for 13 years, but his terrible record encompassed decades.
January 9, 2020 Press Release
Washington, D.C. – Congressman Tom Cole (OK-04) released the following statement after the U.S. House of Representative voted on H. Con. Res. 83, a resolution related to the War Powers Act introduced by Democrats. Cole opposed the resolution.
January 9, 2020 Speech
The political aim here is for our Democratic friends to suggest that the president either wants war with Iran or has acted hastily and precipitously and recklessly. Neither of those things are true.
January 8, 2020 Press Release
Washington, D.C. – Congressman Tom Cole (OK-04) released the following statement after President Donald Trump addressed the nation regarding last night’s Iranian missile strike targeting U.S. military personnel in Iraq.
January 3, 2020 Press Release
Washington, D.C. – Congressman Tom Cole (OK-04), a member of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense, released the following statement after U.S. military airstrikes in Baghdad, ordered by President Donald Trump, killed General Qasem Soleimani, head of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Quds Force.
October 8, 2019 Press Release
Washington, D.C. – Congressman Tom Cole (OK-04), a member of House Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense, released the following statement in response to the Trump Administration’s policy regarding Syria.
September 21, 2019 Press Release
Washington, D.C. – Congressman Tom Cole (OK-04) released the following statement after U.S. Secretary of Defense Mark Esper announced Friday that President Donald Trump has approved deployment of U.S. defensive troops to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates (UAE).
August 6, 2019 Weekly Columns
The United States has been a long-time friend and ally of the Jewish state of Israel. For decades, our country has rightly supported the nation of Israel as one of our greatest allies on the international stage.
June 16, 2019 News Stories
Fox 25 sat down with U.S. Representative Tom Cole (R-OK 4th District) Sunday to discuss major topics in Washington, and how they might impact Oklahomans.

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